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Lisfranc Injury

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Lisfranc Injury

Introduction

A Lisfranc injury (named after a French surgeon serving in the Napoleonic war) is a specific injury of the mid-foot. This type of injury occurs when there is a tear or trauma to the ligaments that help stabilise the long bones of your feet (metatarsals) to the other, smaller bones of your midfoot. These types of injury are quite rare, accounting for approximately 0.2% of all fractures, although in 20% of cases they are misdiagnosed or missed altogether.

Causes

A Lisfranc injury can occur after a high-energy trauma to the midfoot, particularly if the patient land’s forcefully on their flexed toes. This may occur in a sporting setting, such as rugby or gymnastics, but may also occur following a road traffic accident. The injury causes disruption in the ligaments that stabilise the midfoot, leading to injury. This is more commonly seen in men, with two to four times as many cases seen in males.

Symptoms

A Lisfranc injury may be suspected if a patient complains of pain in the midfoot following trauma. The pain in the midfoot may be accompanied by difficulty walking and some visual changes to the appearance of the foot. There may be bruising and swelling around the midfoot, particularly in the hours or days after the initial injury.

Diagnosis

A Lisfranc injury will be diagnosed following a thorough history, a physical examination and with a weight-bearing x-ray. The x-ray may be followed by another type of scan, called a CT scan, which may be used to assess the severity of damage to the ligaments of the midfoot (otherwise known as the degree of instability or displacement).

Management

Surgery is needed for those patients with displaced or unstable Lisfranc joint injuries in order to repair and stabilise this part of the midfoot. The surgeon may use small screws or a metal plate to help fix and stabilise the midfoot joints affected. The patient may then have to spend some time after the procedure in a non-weightbearing walking boot to allow time for healing to take place. This may then be followed by specific rehabilitation to stretch and strengthen the muscles around the foot and ankle. A good Physiotherapy assessment will help the design of a personalised and progressive rehabilitation to produce the best possible outcomes, helping you to fully return to the activities important to you.

Prognosis

It is important to ensure that any suspected Lisfranc injury is appropriately investigated. It may be easier to identify a possible Lisfranc injury from high-speed trauma, but it may be more difficult to spot a possible Lisfranc injury after relatively low-level trauma. If not diagnosed and managed appropriately, an undiagnosed Lisfranc injury may lead to further complications. This may include earlier onset osteoarthritis of the midfoot, instability of the midfoot or difficulty with walking.

 

Despite this, research has shown that if identified and managed surgically, patients with Lisfranc injury can return to high level sport and activity, although time frames for a full return can range from 8 – 12 months.

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